Periodicals

Quick links to periodicals (scroll down to access those not highlighted)

Local Periodicals

Local Alternative Press

Local Antiwar

Local Black Liberation/Civil Rights

Local Community

Local GI/Veterans Press

Local LGBTQ

Local Labor

Local Students (College and University)

Local Students (High School)

Local Women’s Movement

National Periodicals

National Alternative Press

National Antiwar

National Civil Rights & Black Liberation

National GI & Veterans

National Social and Economic Justice

National Student

International Periodicals

Local Periodicals

Local Alternative Press

Washington Area Spark

The Montgomery Spark, The Montgomery County Spark, The Washington Area Spark and its successor publication On The Move  published from 1971-75. Beginning as a radical student newspaper at Montgomery College, it morphed into a “movement” newspaper, then to a working class-based paper and finally as a publication dominated by the Revolutionary Union.

Historical Washington Area Spark (complete set)

Vol. 1 No. 1 – October 5, 1971

Vol. 1 No. 2 – October 25, 1971

Vol. 1 No. 3 – November 19, 1971

Vol. 1 No. 4 – December 10, 1971

Vol. 1 No. 5 – February 29, 1972

Vol. 1 No. 6 – April 15, 1972

Vol. 2 No. 1 – September 6, 1972

Vol. 2 No. 2 – October 4, 1972

Vol. 2 No. 3 – October 31, 1972

Vol. 2 No. 4 – November 19, 1972

Vol. 2 No. 5 – December 20, 1972

Vol. 2 No. 6 – January 20, 1973

Vol. 2 No. 7 – February 21, 1973

Vol. 2 No. 8 – March 14, 1973

Vol. 2 No. 9 – May 11, 1973

Vol. 2 No. 10 – June 12, 1973

Vol. 2 No. 11 – July 11, 1973

Vol. 2 No. 12 – August 17, 1973

Vol. 3 No. 1 – October 11, 1973

Vol. 3 No. 2 – November 24, 1973

Washington Area Spark Artifacts

National Liberation Front headband – 1971-72 – worn at D.C. area antiwar demonstrations by Spark staff

Spark “bomb” headband – 1972 – Worn at D.C. area antiwar demonstrations by Spark staff

On The Move–successor to Washington Area Spark (complete set):

Vol. 1 No. 1 – April-May, 1974

Vol. 1 No. 2 – August, 1974

Vol. 1, No. 3, November, 1974

Vol. 1 No. 4 – December, 1974

Vol. 1 No. 5 – January, 1975

The Daily Rag

The Daily Rag published every two weeks from October 1972 until June 1974. It was a left wing tabloid that reported on local, national and international issues from a radical perspective, but was less flamboyant than the Washington Free Press or Quicksilver Times.

Its first incarnation was as the Colonial Times that published three issues beginning in October 1971 but folded thereafter. The Colonial Times billed itself as the alternative to the Quicksilver Times and the Washington Post.

The Colonial Times then began publishing the Rag in 1972 and claimed a circulation of 36,000 in 1973 for the paper that was distributed free of charge.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – Early October, 1972  

Vol. 1 No. 14 – April 20, 1973  

Vol. 2 No. 7 – November 16, 1973 

Quicksilver Times (nearly complete set)

This newspaper was the premier Washington, D.C. alternative newspaper from 1969 to 1972 along with the Washington Free Press (1967-70) during a period of radical and revolutionary upheaval.

Quicksilver was among the pioneers skillfully utilizing the strengths of offset printing such as color, centerfold and back cover political posters and art, attention getting headlines, large graphics and over time, using white space to focus attention.

On the negative side, its ultization of half-tone graphics overlaid on text, reversed text and a small type face made reading the content difficult at times (though attractive to glance at).

It had excellent coverage of topics such as the Weather Underground, the 1969 Moratoriums, 1970 national student strike, 1970 Revolutionary People’s Constitutional Convention, 1971 People’s Peace Treaty, 1971 Mayday demonstrations, the rise of the women’s liberation and gay liberation movements, the rise and decline of the Black Panther Party, campaigns to free political prisoners, the youth culture and the co-op movement.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – June 16, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 2 – June 27, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 3 – July 10, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 4 – July 21, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 5 – August 1, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 6 – August 12, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 7 – August 26, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 8 – September 10, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 9 – September 21,  1969

Vol. 1 No. 10 – October 1, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 11 – October 18, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 12 – October 29, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 13 – November 13, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 14 – November 26, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 15 – December 8, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 16 – December 19, 1969

Vol. 2 No. 1 – January 9, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 2 – January 19, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 3 – January 30, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 4 – February 9, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 5 – February 20, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 6 – March 3, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 7 – March 13, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 8 – March 24, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 9 – April 3, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 10 – April 14, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 11 – May 8, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 12 – May 18, 1970

Vol. 2 No 13 – unavailable at this time

Vol. 2 No. 14 – June 9, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 15 – June 23, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 16 – July 3, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 17 – July 14, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 18 – July 28, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 19 – August 8, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 20 – August 18, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 21 – September 1, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 22 – September 15, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 23 – September 26,  1970

Vol. 2 No. 24 – October 5, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 25 – October 19, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 26 – October 31, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 27 – November 10, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 28 – November 24, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 29 – December 8, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 30 – December 22, 1970

Vol. 3 No. 1 – January 16, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 2 – January 30, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 3 – February 17, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 4 – March 2, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 5 – March 17, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 6 – March 31, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 7 – April 14, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 8 – April 30, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 9 – May 15, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 10 – June 2, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 11 – June 13, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 12 – July 3, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 13 – July 17, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 14 – July 30, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 15 – August 14, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 16 – August 28, 1971 (duplicate date and volume number)

Vol. 3 No. 17 – August 28, 1971 (duplicate date and volume number)

Vol. 3 No. 18 – September 16, 1971 (possibly misdated)

Vol. 3 No. 19 – October 13, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 20 – October 29, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 21 – November 12,  1971

Vol. 3 No. 22 – November 25, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 23 – December 14, 1971

Vol. 3 No. 24 – December 31, 1971

Vol. 4 No. 1 – January 14, 1972

Vol. 4 No. 2 – January 28, 1972

Vol. 4 No. 3 – February 15, 1972

Vol. 4 No. 4 – March 3, 1972

Vol. 4 No. 5 – March 23, 1972

Vol. 4 No. 6 – April 12, 1972

Vol. 4 No. 7 – May 2, 1972

Vol. 4 No. 8 – May 31, 1972

Vol. 4 No. 9 – July 30, 1972

Red Earth

The last issue of Washington, D.C.-based Red Earth alternative newspaper published as a mini-manual of urban guerilla warfare circa June 1970. The politics of the paper are closely aligned with the Weathermen (later Weather Underground).

Included is a statement from the Weathermen after the bombing of the New York City police headquarters that occurred on June 9, 1970.

The 20-page tabloid also covers arms, logistics, tactics, 7 sins that a guerrilla can commit, popular support and recruitment.

The paper was apparently laid-out as a 16-page paper, but expanded to 20 pages with the inclusion of an unnumbered 4-page insert in the center of the tabloid.

No Volume or Issue number – June 1970

Voice from the Mother Country

A staff split at the Quicksilver Times alternative newspaper resulted in about half the staff leaving to publish one issue of Voice from the Mother Country in April 1970. They took over the Quicksilver offices at 1932 17th Street NW that later in the year became the Community Center of the Black Panther Party.

The start-up paper was effectively ended by an FBI raid on May 7, 1970 that was ostensibly looking for former DC Regional SDS leader Cathy Wilkerson who at the time was a fugitive member of the Weather Underground Organization. Two of the staff members of the Voice were arrested on weapons charges.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – April 1970 – Note pages 3 and 4 are damaged

Washington Free Press

The Washington Free Press published from 1966 to 1969 and became the first of the 1960s “underground” newspapers in the Washington, D.C. area.

It began as an intercollegiate newspaper in the area in 1966 and in April 1967 began publishing as an area-wide alternative newspaper.

It started as an eight-page weekly tabloid publishing investigative pieces and exposes not covered by the mainstream press but in a writing style not much different from than the three daily newspapers that served the city.

By 1968 it was publishing a 24 or 28-page issue every two weeks or so and had adopted a more free-form style of journalism where opinion was mixed freely with reporting. Its politics evolved from a left-liberal bent to youth culture to revolutionary over a three-year span.

Under pressure from authorities, internal issues, and from the start-up alternative newspaper Quicksilver Times, the Free Press began faltering in its last year of publication. It moved to a monthly and then abandoned a regular schedule. Its once lively content began to fade and it ceased publication in December 1969.

This collection needs work. Most issues of the area-wide paper are represented, but many are missing pages and the quality of the scans is less than desirable. If you have copies of the Washington Free Press or know where to obtain them, please e-mail washington_area_spark@yahoo.com

Vol. 2 No. 1 – March 26 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 2 – April 2, 1967 – missing pages 

Vol. 2 No. 3 & 4 – April 19, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 5 – April 26, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 6 – May 5, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 7 – May 22, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 8 – June 6, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 9 – June 14, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 10 – Not available at this time

Vol. 2 No. 11 – June 30, 1967 – missing page 

Vol. 2 No. 12 – July 21, 1967

Vol. 2 No. 13 – August 4, 1967  

Vol. 2 No. 14 – August 20, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 15 – September 3, 1967

Vol. 2 No. 16 – October 14, 1967

Vol. 2 No. 17 – October 31, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 18 – November 3, 1967 ca. – Extra 

Vol. 2 No. 19 – November 23, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 20 – December 12, 1967

Vol. 2 No. 21 – December 31, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 22 – January 14, 1968  

Vol. 2 No. 23 – February 3, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 24 – February 20, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 25 – February 29, 1968 – pages 1 & 2 from color scan 

Vol. 2 No. 26 – March 7, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 27 – Not available at this time

Vol. 2 No. 28 – March 27, 1968

Vol. 2 No. 29 – Not available at this time

Vol. 2 No. 30 – May 8, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 31 – May 18, 1968 – missing pages

Vol. 2 No. 32 – Not available at this time

Vol. 2 No. 33 – Not available at this time

Vol. 2 No. 34 – July 16, 1968  

Vol. 2 No. 35 – July 26, 1968 Special Edition 

Vol. 2 No. 36 – July 27, 1968, Special Edition 

Vol. 2 No. 37 – August 1, 1968

Vol. 2 No. 38 – Not available at this time

Vol. 2 No. 39 – September 1, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 40 – September 15, 1968 – missing pages 

Vol. 2 No. 41 – October 1, 1968 – missing pages 

Vol. 2 No. 42 – Not available at this time

Vol. 2 No. 43 – November 1, 1968 – missing pages  

Vol. 2 No. 44 – November 15, 1968 – missing pages 

Vol. 2 No. 45 – December 1, 1968 – missing page 

Vol. 2 No. 46 – December 16, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 47 – January 1, 1969 – missing pages

Vol. 2 No. 48 – January 16, 1969 –missing pages  

Vol. 2 No. 49 – February 1, 1969 – from color scan

Vol. 2 No. 50 – February 15, 1969 – from color scan  

Vol. 2 No. 51 – Not available at this time

Vol. 2 No. 52 – March, 15, 1969 – from color scan

Vol. 3 No. 1 – April 1, 1969 –missing page  

Vol. 3 No. 2 – Not available at this time

Vol. 3 No. 3 – May 1, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 4 – May 16, 1969 –missing pages

Vol. 3 No. 5 – June 1, 1969 – from color scan  

Vol. 3 No. 6 – July 1, 1969 – missing pages 

Vol. 3 No. 7 – August 1, 1969 – missing pages 

Vol. 3 No. 8 – August (late) 1969 – missing pages  

Vol. 3 No. 9 – September (early) 1969 – missing pages 

Vol. 3 No. 10 – October (early) 1969 – missing pages 

Vol. 3 No. 11 – November (early) 1969 – pages 11-14  from color scan, missing pages  

Vol. 3 No. 12 – December (Christmas) 1969 

Local Antiwar

The Mourning Dove

The Mourning Dove was the newsletter of the Washington Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, a broad coalition that sponsored local peace demonstrations as well as organizing for national demonstrations like the October 1967 march on the Pentagon and the August 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention.

The local group was most active in 1967 and 1968 and served as the local arm of the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, often called the Mobe.

It grew out of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam that was organized to build for a large anti-Vietnam War demonstration in New York City in April 1967.

The newsletter was mimeographed on 8 ½ x 11 paper. Issues currently available are:

Vol. 1 No. 2 – June 9, 1967 

Vol. 1 No. 3 – (mis-numbered as No. 2) – June 23, 1967 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – July 8, 1967

Local Black Liberation/Civil Rights Press

Baltimore Panther Trial News

The Baltimore Panther Trial News was published by the Committee to Defend Political Prisoners in Baltimore, Md. and focused its work on members and a supporter of the Baltimore Black Panther Party accused in the July 1969 slaying of an alleged police informant.

The group expanded its efforts holding rallies in support of prison rebellions. It was composed of Black Panther Party sympathizers, some of whom were involved with the Mother Jones collective that operated in the city 1970-72.

No Volume or Issue Number – circa May 1971 

Finally Got the News

Published by the Washington, D.C. African Liberation Support Committee. This issue reflects the group’s turn toward the working class and Marxism-Leninism.

Vol. 1 No. 5 – May 1974

Third World

Third World was an independent Washington, D.C. area periodical tabloid dedicated to black liberation that began publishing in September 1969 and continued through the early 1970s.

The paper concentrated on news of black liberation, pan-Africanism and providing news stories and interviews related to black political thought. It also published poems, photographs and other artwork and reviewed performances of black artists.

The paper was financed through both sales (25 cents per copy) and advertisements, although donations played a major role. 

Distribution was through both street sellers who were usually children who kept a portion of the sales money, subscriptions and through retail outlets. The paper’s goal was 24 issues per year, but it does not seem like that frequency was met.

Vol. 2 No. 1 – Oct. 1970

Vol. 2 No. 6 – Apr. 1971

U-BAD Newsletter

United Blacks Against Discrimination (U-BAD) was a group of civilian workers and GIs at Walter Reed Army Medical Hospital 1972-? that attacked issues of racial discrimination at the sprawling facility located in NW Washington, D.C.

It was headed by Nell Pendleton who filed a number of lawsuits against the facility for bias and organized demonstrations against white supremacy.

Vol 2 No 57 – October 1975 ca.

Local Community Press

Fields of Plenty

Fields of Plenty Community Newsletter was published by a cooperative that operated a healthy food and drug store and  at 2447 16th Street NW.

The coop saw itself as part of a broader movement that could demonstrate a better future through cooperative effort. It sought to bring low cost food to city residents through an anti-profit enterprise.

The coop also sought to build political support to oppose a food tax in the city and encouraged building tenants unions.

It was first established in March 1974 and continued operation at least through 1981.

Vol. 1 No. 3 – July 1974  

The Voice of Mother Jones

The Voice of Mother Jones was the community newspaper of the Mother Jones Collective in Baltimore, Md. The collective functioned as a predominantly white organization organized similar to and parallel with the Baltimore Black Panther Party.

The organization existed circa 1970-72 after which many of its members joined the Revolutionary Union—a predecessor organization to the Revolutionary Communist Party.

The collective operated under a “serve the people” philosophy and ran a free lunch program for children in a working class community, a “liberation school,” a film program and a recreation program for children.

Politically, a spokesperson once described it as “Marxist-Maoist” and the group carried out demonstrations against conditions in the city jail, against rising bread prices, and in support of a bakery strike.

No. 3 – circa September 1970  

Local GI/Veterans press

B.E.F. News

Two of the first issues of the B.E.F. News published June 25, 1932 and July 9, 1932 by the Bonus Expeditionary Force-BEF-or Bonus Army are published for the estimated 50,000 people that made up their encampments around the Washington, D.C.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – June 25, 1932

Vol. 1 No. 3 – July 9 1932

Concerned Officers Movement Newsletter

The Concerned Officers Movement newsletter was a result of one officer’s participation as a marshal in the November 15, 1969 Moratorium anti-Vietnam War march where he was featured in the Washington Post and later received an unsatisfactory notation for loyalty in his fitness report. Other officers rallied to this officer.

From the group’s first newsletter:

“COM is opposed to the preponderant share of national resources devoted to the military. While Americans go hungry, while cities decay, while our natural resources become more despoiled, the Pentagon is able to get billions of dollars for an ABM [anti-ballistic missile] system that may not even work. National defense is important, but so are poverty, education, and the environment. It is time to reexamine our priorities.”

“Within the military structure itself, COM supports the free expression of dissenting opinion. GI movements with legitimate grievances have too long been suppressed. By a military hierarchy that considers honest questioning a threat to its power. The military can no longer consider itself a closed, private sector of society; the constitutional right of free speech must be guaranteed for all servicemen”

Vol. 1 No. 1 – April 1970 

Highway 13

Highway 13 was a tabloid published periodically from 1972-75 for Maryland veterans and GIs and one of the longer running GI-oriented newspapers in the country.

Excerpts from the May 1974 issue:

“Highway 13 is an independent newspaper written and distributed by a working collective of GIs, veterans, and concerned people living in the Baltimore/Washington area.

“The primary purpose of Highway 13 is to promote GI empowerment by rank and file unity.

“The fundamental political position of Highway 13 is anti-imperialist.

“We stand for a military justice system which is not part of the chain0-of-command and that gives us full constitutional and civil rights.”

Vol. 1 No. 1 – circa August 1972 

Vol. 1 No. 2 – November, 1972 

Vol. 1 No. 3 – February 1973 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – April 1973 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – June 1973 

Vol. 1 No. 6 – July 1973 

Vol. 1 No. 7 – August 1973 

Vol. 2 No. 1 – September 1973  

Vol. 2 No. 2 – November 1973 

Vol. 2 No. 3 – December 1973 

Vol. 2 No. 4 – February 1974 

Vol. 2 No. 5 – April 1974 

Vol. 2 No. 6 – May 1974 

Vol. 2 No. 7 – July 1974 

Vol. 2 No. 8 – September 1974 

Vol. 3 No. 1 – October 1974 

Vol. 3 No. 2 – November 1974 

Vol. 3 No. 3 – Unavailable at this time

Vol. 3 No. 4 – March 1975 

Vol. 3 No. 5 – May 1975 

No Volume or Issue Number – Undated 

Left Face

Left Face was a newsletter published in the Washington, D.C. area for active duty military personnel 1975-77. It was initially a project of the Military Law Project which itself was a project of the National Lawyers Guild. It was published by the Enlisted People’s Organizing Committee.

The newspaper acted as an antiwar vehicle, provided legal advice for military personnel and advocated for organizing servicemembers into a union.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – December 1975  

Vol. 1 No. 2 – March 1976  

Vol. 1 No. 3 – May 1976 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – August 1976 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – November 1976  

Vol. 2 No. 1 – March 1977 

Vol. 2 No. 1 – March. 1977 – misdated and mis-numbered 

Vol. 2 No. 3 – October 1977 

Military Law Project News-Notes

The Military Law Project News-Notes was published in 1975 by the organization of the same name.  The MLP was an off-shoot of the National Lawyers Guild funded by the American Friends Service Committee and operated in the Washington, D.C. area. During the mid-1970s. A drive to unionize GIS spawned the MLP to form the Enlisted People’s Organizing Committee which published a successor publication called Left Face.

A lengthy explanation of why the Military Law Project was formed is published in the July 1975 issue of News-Notes.

July 1975 – (no volume or number) 

September 1975 – (no volume or number) 

November 1975 – (no volume or number) 

OM

OM newsletter was published by Roger Priest, a seaman apprentice journalist assigned to the Pentagon and the Washington Navy Yard 1969-70 that criticized the brass, opposed the war in Vietnam and urged military personnel to form a union and had a national circulation of about 1,000.

Its publication resulted in a court martial for Priest where he faced charges of soliciting fellow soldiers to desert, urging insubordination and making statements disloyal to the United States that could have resulted in up to six years hard labor, forfeiture of pay and grade and a dishonorable discharge.

Priest was ultimately convicted of promoting disloyalty and given a reprimand, reduction in rank and a bad conduct discharge. At the time it was regarded as a victory for Priest.

In 1971, a panel of Navy appeals judges reversed that conviction and awarded Priest an honorable discharge, A later review of the case by Rear Admiral George Koch, commandant of the Washington Naval District, dropped the reprimand.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – April 1, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 2 – May 1, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 3 – June 1969 

Special Edition – July 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – October 1, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – January 1970 

Vol. 1 No. 6 – April 1970  

Special Edition – April 1970 

Thank You to Subscribers -= April 8, 1970 

Special Edition – May 1, 1970 

Open Sights

Open Sights was a GI tabloid newspaper published from 1969-72 in the Washington, D.C. area. First based in Laurel, Md., its offices later moved to Washington, D.C.

The newspaper was loosely affiliated with the Student Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam in its early years and later loosely affiliated with the Washington Area Military & Draft Law Panel.

No. 1 – February 1969 

No. 2 – March 21, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 3 – April 18, 1969 

Vol. 2 No. 1 – February 1, 1970 

Vol. 2 No. 2 – March 1, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 3 – April 1970 

Vol. 2 No. 4 – May 1970 

Vol. 2 No. 5 – Early summer 1970  

Vol. 2 No. 6 – September 1970 ca. 

Vol. 2 No. 7 – October 1970  

Vol. 2 No. 8 – November 1970 

Vol. 3 No. 1 – January 1971  

Vol. 3 No. 2 – March 1971 

Vol. 3 No. 4. – April 1971 

No Volume or Issue No. – April 1972 

No Volume or Issue No. – May 1972  

No Volume or Issue No. – June 1972 

No Volume or Issue No. – July 1972 

The Liberated Castle

The Liberated Castle was a newsletter put out by GIs out Fort Belvoir in Virginia in 1971. Real names were often signed and at least two active duty personnel were interviewed on the record by The Liberated Castle. It was an antiwar and soldiers’ rights publication.

From their second issue:

“We began meeting at the Friends’ Meeting House one month ago. We were eight GIs. Over the past month we put out our first issue of The Liberated  Castle. We have begun to teach ourselves—about our Rights, about the conditions of our lives, about the nature of rank and caste systems. But mostly we are beginning to learn about ourselves and the power that we have when we liberate our thinking and act together.”

Vol. 1 No. 1 – June 1971  

Vol. 1 No. 2 – August 1971 

The Oppressed

The Oppressed was published by GI’s stationed at Walter Reed Hospital, then located in the District of Columbia, in 1971.

“The Oppressed arose from the frustration and anger toward the oppressive military system of a group of GI’s stationed here at Walter Reed Hospital…Since basic training, all of us have felt strongly the powerlessness of the GI in the army and we realize the need to express the ultimate freedom that not even the military can take from us.

“At its roots anti-war and anti-army, the Oppressed is an outlet for the individual to voice anything he has to say.”

–from the Oppressed, June 14, 1971

Vol. 1 No. 1 – April 1, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – June 14, 1971 

The Pawn

The Pawn was published by the Frederick GIs United during 1969-70 “for the purpose of promoting free speech and GI rights.” The publication was mainly based at Ft. Detrick in Maryland.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – November 1969  

Vol. 1 No. 2 – December, 1969  

Vol. 1 No. 3 – February, 1970 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – April 1970 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – June 1970 

Vol. 2 No. 1 – August 1970 

Vol. 2 No. 2 – November 1970 

Undated and unnumbered #1  

Undated and unnumbered #2 

U-BAD Newsletter

United Blacks Against Discrimination (U-BAD) was a group of civilian workers and GIs at Walter Reed Army Medical Hospital 1972-? that attacked issues of racial discrimination at the sprawling facility located in NW Washington, D.C.

It was headed by Nell Pendleton who filed a number of lawsuits against the facility for bias and organized demonstrations against white supremacy.

Vol 2 No 57 – October 1975 ca.

Local LGBTQ

The Furies

The Furies was published by a Washington, D.C. lesbian separatist collective 1972-73. All issues are available at the Independent Voices website.

Collective member Ginny Berson wrote in the first issue “… Sexism is the root of all other oppressions, and Lesbian and woman oppression will not end by smashing capitalism, racism, and imperialism. Lesbianism is not a matter of sexual preference, but rather one of political choice which every woman must make if she is to become woman-identified and thereby end male supremacy.”

Vol. 1 No 1 through Vol. 2 No. 3 – January 1972 through May 1973 (off-site at Independent Voices) 

The Washington Blade

Originally published as the Gay Blade, the periodical has covered the Washington, D.C. area’s LBGTQ community since 1969 and as of 2020 continues to publish an online version

The District of Columbia Public Library has digitalized copies from 1969 – 1996

Vol. 1 No. 1 through Vol. 25 No. 53 – October 1, 1969 through December 30, 1994 – (off-site at the D.C. Public Library)  

Local Labor Press

Action

The Metro Workers Rank and File Action Caucus was formed in the wake of the 1978 cost-of-living wildcat strike that paralyzed bus service and the embryonic subway service for a week in July 1978. At least two caucuses arose out of the strike. One was influenced by the Progressive Labor Party and the other was the Action Caucus.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – Sept. 5, 1978

Vol.1. No. 2 – Oct. 1978

Vol. 1 No. 3 – Nov. 1978

Vol. 1 No. 4 – Jan. 1979

Vol. 1 No. 5 – Jun. 1979

Vol. 1 No. 6 – Aug. 1979

AFSCME in Action

The first issue of American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Local 1072’s AFSCME in Action newsletter from September 1973.

The union represented about 1300 University of Maryland College Park campus workers but did not have collective bargaining rights at that time.

The first issue covers campus layoffs, racial discrimination, a rival employee association, the union picnic, safety, a call to impeach Nixon and other issues.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – Sep. 1973

Vol. 7 No. 9 – Sep. 1977

Annapolis Report

The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Maryland Public Employees Council 67  legislative newsletter.

Vol. 2. No. 2 – Feb. 12,, 1974

Metro C.A.R.

Metro C.A.R. was published by a rank-and-file caucus at the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) that existed for a number of years from approximately 1978 to 1996. It published periodic newsletters and flyers. We currently have one issue published after a wildcat strike by workers in July 1978

No volume or issue number – Aug. 1978 ca.

The Trades Unionist

The Trades Unionist was published by the Washington, D.C. Central Labor Council since 1896, but the shrinking of union membership eventually forced it to end publication. It was replaced in the 21st Century with a daily online newsletter by the umbrella labor group for unions in the greater Washington area.

The Central Labor Council is now known as the Washington Metropolitan Council, AFL-CIO.

No Vol. or Issue – Oct. 15, 1976

U-BAD Newsletter

United Blacks Against Discrimination (U-BAD) was a group of civilian workers and GIs at Walter Reed Army Medical Hospital 1972-? that attacked issues of racial discrimination at the sprawling facility located in NW Washington, D.C.

It was headed by Nell Pendleton who filed a number of lawsuits against the facility for bias and organized demonstrations against white supremacy.

Vol 2 No 57 – October 1975 ca.

Washington, D.C. Teacher

The Washington, D.C. Teacher was the newsletter of the Washington Teachers Union (American Federation of Teachers (AFT) Local 6).

The issues available include articles on new methods of education, anti-Vietnam War activities, a demonstration against red-baiting surrounding Antioch College, contract talks and other local union business.

The following issues of the Washington Teacher, usually published as a tabloid, are currently available:

Vol. 5 No. 7 – June 1970

Special Issue – July 1970 

Vol. 6 No. 1 – October 1970 

Vol. 6 No. 5 – April 1971

Local Student (College and University)

University of Maryland SDS Spark

The University of Maryland College Park Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) published a newsletter 1967-68 that inspired the later Montgomery College Spark, some of whom had attended UMD SDS meetings.

In August 1967, the UMD SDS began publishing a daily edition of a newsletter named Spark directed toward the delegates to a National Student Association (NSA) convention that was being held on campus shortly after the revelations that NSA had been partially funded by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA).

We currently have one issue:

Aug. 23, 1967

Thereafter, the Spark became a semi-regular SDS publication on campus. We have four issues:

Sept. 1967 ca.

Nov. 28, 1967

Jan. 15, 1968

May 7, 1968

In addition, the UMD SDS published an internal newsletter called Snark. We have two issues:

Vol. 2 No. 1 – Jan. 24, 1968

Vol. 2 No. 2 – Mar. 1, 1968

An internal organizing letter from Gregory Dunkel that served the same purpose as Snark:

August 26, 1968

University of Maryland Route One Gazette

After the Students for Democratic Society splintered in the Fall of 1969 and the student strike of 1970, left-wing UMD students formed the Democratic Radical Union of Maryland (DRUM) to take the place of SDS. It lasted through the school year of 1970-71. They published The Radical Guide to the University of Maryland and the Route One Gazette:

Vol. 2 No. 1 – Winter 1971

Local Student Publications (High School)

MCSA Newsletter

The MCSA Newsletter was the publication of the Montgomery County Student Alliance, a brief-lived coalition of students from different high schools in the county seeking educational reform.

The Alliance issued a 17-page report and lobbied the county’s board of education to make changes.

The group was composed of about 1,000 individual members and operated openly, publishing the names of its contacts at each school and seeking the approval to distribute its newsletter in the schools and pledging not to change content to satisfy administrators.

In 1987 It was revealed that the Federal Bureau of Investigation conducted surveillance of the group and its members. The surveillance was conducted under the Bureau’s Cointelpro program of disruption of left-leaning groups in the United States.

A Freedom of Information request by Norman Solomon a former leader of the group led to a heavily redacted disclosure that somewhere between 15-30 students were targeted at a minimum of six high schools: Montgomery Blair, Walt Whitman, Winston Churchill, Springbrook, Wheaton and Northwood.

A later individual Freedom of Information request by Spark contributor Craig Simpson revealed that he was one of those targeted while a student at Springbrook High School.

Number 1 – February 26, 1969 

Outcry

The only issue published of a Springbrook High School student-produced newsletter where students signed their names to the articles and challenged the administration to discipline them.

Spark contributors Robert “Bob” Simpson and Craig Simpson are among the authors. Articles critique high school suppression of expression, the dress code, the 1968 elections, school presentation of drug information and a call for a student bill of rights.

The newsletter was published with assistance of the Washington Free Community. Springbrook H. S. is located in Montgomery County, Maryland.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – January 12, 1969

Resistance

Resistance was produced by and for greater Washington, D.C. area high school students with the assistance of members of the Democratic Radical Union of Maryland (DRUM)—a successor organization to the Students for Democratic Society on the College Park campus.

Articles cover the Revolutionary People’s Constitutional Convention, reports from Northwestern, Blair and Oxen Hill High Schools, a critique of the Montgomery County student smoking policy, an essay on discrimination and sexism against high school women, an anti-ROTC article, and draft counseling.

Vol. 1 No. 2 – October 1970

Truth

A newsletter named “Truth” by and for high school students is produced in connection with the University of Maryland Students for a Democratic Society chapter in October 1967.

The newsletter had little local high school news but instead covered political topics.

It would be the first of a number of attempts to do outreach to high schools in the greater Washington, D.C. area by SDS

Vol. 1 No. 1 – October 1967

Local Women’s Movement

Off Our Backs

Off Our Backs was a long-running women’s news journal published from 1970-2008. The publications was based in Washington, D.C. and in its early years widely covered events in the city. All issues are available on the pay site JSTOR.  The site linked to here is Independent Voices and has 69 issues posted from 1970 – 1976.

Vol. 1 No. 1 through Vol. 5 No. 11 – February 1970 through January 1976 – (off-site at Independent Voices)  

National  Periodicals

National Alternative Press

Hard Times (formerly Mayday)

Hard Times had its beginnings in October 1968 when three Washington, D.C. journalists produced a weekly four page investigative and opinion tabloid called Mayday.

In April 1969 the publishers changed its name to Hard Times after receiving a request from the  trademark holder of the international distress call to change their name.

The tabloid-size paper was more traditional journalism than “underground,” but it pursued topics of a left-leaning nature of interest to a national audience.

The paper folded in 1970 and several of its staff went to work for Ramparts Magazine, producing a supplement to the magazine that was also named Hard Times.

Number 43 – September 8, 1969 

National Antiwar

Memo

Memo was the bulletin of Women’s Strike for Peace, a group which sprang up almost overnight staging a national demonstration of 50,000 women and supporters to demand nuclear disarmament in 1961.

The group staged a number of high-profile demonstrations and was at least partially responsible for the 1963 Nuclear Test Ban Treaty between the U.S. and the Soviet Union. WSP was also notable for its leader Dagmar Wilson’s skillful rebuke of the House Un-American Activities Committee.

WSP would become early opponents of the Vietnam War and continue its opposition to the Gulf War and for nuclear disarmament in the 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s.

Prominent members included founder Dagmar Wilson, U.S. Rep. Bella Abzug, Barbara Bick who edited the group’s bulletin and Edith Villastrigo who served as WSP’s legislative director and who was previously the personal secretary to William Z Foster, head of the Communist Party USA.

The group occupied a unique position as a women’s organization between the first and second wave feminism.

Issues are courtesy of the Wisconsin Historical Society

Vol. 4 No. 12 – June 1966 

No Volume or Issue No. – July 1966 

Vol. 5 No. 2 – September 1966  

Vol. 5 No. 3 – October 1966 

Vol. 5 No. 4 –  December 1966 ca. 

Vol. 5 No. 5 – January 1967  

Vol. 5 No. 6 – February 1967 

Vol. 5 No. 7 – March 1967 

Vol. 5 No. 8 – April 1967  

Vol. 5 No. 9 – May 1967  

Vol. 5 No. 10 – June 1967  

Vol. 5 No. 11 – August 1967 

No Volume or Issue No. – October 1967  

Vol. 6 No. 1 – November 1967 

No Volume or Issue No. – January 1968 ca. 

Vol. 6 No. 3 – February 1968 

Vol. 6 No. 4 – March 1968  

Vol. 6 No. 5 – May. 1968 

Vol. 6 No 6 – September 1968 

Vol. 6 No. 7 – October 1968  

Vol. 6 No. 8 – November 1968 

No Volume or Issue No. – January 1969  

No Volume or Issue No. – April 1969 

No Volume or Issue No. – Fall 1969 

No Volume or Issue No. – Summer 1970 

Movin’ Together

Movin’ Together was the newsletter of the People’s Coalition for Peace and Justice (PCPJ) that included various peace, anti-poverty, and labor groups. These groups worked together to confront the related issues of war in Southeast Asia and racism, sexism, poverty, and repression in the United States 1970-72.

The national antiwar movement split into two large coalitions in 1969-70. The other coalition to arise was National Peace Action Coalition (NPAC). They two were distinguished by PCPJ’s embrace of other issues besides the Vietnam War and PCPJ’s willingness to engage in civil disobedience.

NPAC had a single demand, “Out Now,” and did not endorse civil disobedience.

PCPJ and NPAC jointly sponsored the May 9, 1970 march on Washington after President Nixon’s invasion of Cambodia and the shooting deaths of four students at Kent State University and an April 24, 1971 mass march on Washington the following year.

PCPJ was founded in 1970 as National Coalition Against War, Racism, and Repression and also organized several specific campaigns including People’s Peace Treaty, Citizen’s Action Pledge, and Nixon Eviction campaign; reports, speeches, and resolutions pertaining to the Assembly for Peace and Independence of the People of Indochina held at Versailles, France, February 1972. 

Issues are from the Spark collection and the Wisconsin Historical Society

March 19, 1971 

April 1, 1971 ca. 

April 17, 1971  

May 14, 1971 

May 28, 1971 

June 16, 1971 

July 15, 1971  

September 21, 1971  

April 1972 

October 1972 

The Peace Times

The Peace Times was the short-lived newsletter of the Vietnam Moratorium Committee, the organization that sponsored perhaps the largest anti-Vietnam War demonstrations in the October and November 1969 Moratoriums (or strike) against the war that involved upwards of two million people.

The Moratorium’s principal organizers (Sam Brown, David Hawk, David Mixner and Marge Sklencar) and volunteers were mainly veterans of the 1968 Eugene McCarthy and Robert Kennedy campaigns for president who turned to grassroots organizing when Richard Nixon was elected president in November 1968.

The Committee was not able to duplicate its success and a few weeks after its second newsletter issue, the organization disbanded after antiwar protests set around the April 15th tax day largely fizzled. In an April 20, 1970 letter to supporters the organizers wrote there was “little prospect of immediate) change in the Administration’s policy in Vietnam.”

Unbeknownst to its organizers, President Richard Nixon would set off a firestorm of protest just 10 days later on April 30, 1970 when he ordered U.S. troops to invade Cambodia. Students at college campuses across the country staged strikes and mass demonstrations and over 100,000 people rallied against the war in Washington, D.C. with less than a week’s notice.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – March 7, 1970

Vol. 1 No. 2 – March 21, 1970 

Vol. 1 No. 3 – April 7, 1970

The Resistance

The Resistance newsletter was the national publication of the draft resistance group The Resistance thrived from 1967-68 urging young men to refuse to cooperate with the Selective Service System in protest of the Vietnam War.

The group was formed in early 1967 on the West Coast by prominent antiwar activists David Harris, Dennis Sweeney, Steve Hamilton and Lenny Heller and spread across the nation.

The group organized draft card turn ins and burnings—actions which could result in five years imprisonment and a $10,000 fine. They organized demonstrations to support draft refusers and set an example themselves by publicly refusing to cooperate with the draft.

No. 3 – October 1967 

No. 5 – January 31, 1968 

Vietnam Summer News

Vietnam Summer News was the national publication of Vietnam Summer, a temporary coalition of a number of groups in 1967, but primarily backed by the American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) to convince non-student Americans to oppose the war in Vietnam.

The project expanded to 48 states and Vietnam Summer News reached a circulation of 65,000 during its six issue run. It was modeled after the 1964 civil rights Freedom Summer.

Two staff members paid by AFSC coordinated the national office while 26,000 volunteers worked in 700 local projects across the country.

The effort involved door-to-door canvassing, teach-ins, counseling on draft resistance, local antiwar demonstrations, working to get antiwar referenda on the ballot, and the dissemination of antiwar literature.

The group only published six issues during the summer of 1967 and the group disbanded thereafter, although many local efforts continued.

No. 6 – August 25, 1967 

National Civil Rights/Black Liberation

The African World

The African World was published by the Youth Organization for Black Unity (YOBU) as a national tabloid newspaper 1971-74 covering U.S. black liberation struggles, African liberation struggles and acting as a forum for theoretical articles and speeches on black liberation.

Publication began In 1971 when the Student Organization for Black Unity (SOBU), led by Nelson Johnson, launched the SOBU Newsletter, which it soon renamed The African World. SOBU changed its name shortly thereafter to YOBU. The group developed chapters in a number of cities across the U.S., including Washington, D.C.

The newspaper, along with the organization took a leftward turn and began embracing Marxism-Leninism before disbanding with many of its most dedicated cadre forming the brief-lived Revolutionary Workers League in 1974. 

Vol. 2 No. 2 – October 14, 1972

Babylon

Babylon was published by the Revolutionary People’s Communication Network that was created by Kathleen and Eldridge Cleaver and their allies after a dispute in the Black Panther Party leadership led to the expulsion of the Cleavers, the other Panthers in exile, Geronimo Pratt and almost the entire New York City branch from the group in 1971.

Kathleen Cleaver returned from exile in Algeria to set up the communications network that published Babylon and other revolutionary tracts. The Cleavers saw their role as providing the above-ground political support for the armed struggle.

Newspapers published by the group also included Voice of the Lumpen, published in West Germany, and Right On!—which replaced Babylon as the chief newspaper of the group in 1972.

We currently hold one issue of Babylon:

Vol. 1 No. 3 – December 15, 1971 

The Black Panther

The Black Panther the official organ of the Black Panther Party and was published from 1967 to 1980. The newspaper was most popular from 1968-1972, and during this time sold a hundred thousand copies a week. A total of 537 issues were published during its lifespan.

The Panthers initiated community service programs in the black community such as free breakfast for children, free clothing, pre-school classes, and organizing buses for visitors to prisoners. They also were strident defenders of the black community against police violence and advocated armed self-defense. The group was violently attacked by police forces across the country, most famously when Chicago Black Panther leaders Fred Hampton and Mark Clark were assassinated by police in 1969. Much of their activity was consumed by legal defense of their members in high profile trials of two of their leaders–Huey Newton and Bobby Seale–as well as defenses of chapter members in New York, New Haven, Baltimore, New Orleans  and elsewhere.

Copies of the newspaper are from our own files, The Wisconsin Historical Society, Freedom Archives, It’s About Time website and the Roz Payne Sixties Archive.

Vol. 1 No. 3 – June 20, 1967 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – July 3, 1967 

Vol. 1 No. 6 – November 23, 1967  

Vol. 2 No. 1 – March 16, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 2 – May 4, 1968 (page missing) 

Vol. 2 No. 5 – September 7, 1968 (some pages missing)  

Vol. 2 No. 6 – September 14, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 9 – October 19, 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 10 – October 26, 1968  

Vol. 2 No. 15-17 – December 1968 

Vol. 2 No. 19 – January 4, 1969  

Vol. 2 No. 20 – January 15, 1969  

Vol. 2 No. 21 – January 23, 1969  – 

Vol. 2 No.  21 – February 2, 1969 – (incorrect number)

Vol. 2 No. 23 – February 17, 1969 

Vol. 2 No. 30 – April 20, 1969  

Vol. 3 No. 1 – April 27, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 2 – May 4, 1969

Vol. 3 No. 7 – June 7, 1969  

Vol. 3 No. 8 – June 14, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 9 – June 21, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 10 – June 28, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 11 – July 5, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 12 – July 12, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 13 – July 19, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 14 – July 26, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 17 – August 16, 1969  

Vol. 3 No. 18 – August 23, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 19 – August 30, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 20 – September 6, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 21 – September. 13, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 22 – September 20, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 23 – September 27, 1969 

Vol. 3 No. 27 – October 25, 1969  

Vol. 3 No. 29 – November 6, 1969

Vol. 3 No. 29 – November 15, 1969 – (Incorrect number) 

Vol. 3 No. 31 – November 22, 1969

Vol. 3 No. 32 – November 29, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 1 – December 6, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 2 – December 13, 1969  

Vol. 4 No. 3 – December 20, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 4 – December 27, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 5 – January 3, 1970 

Vol. 4 No. 6 – January 10, 1970 

Vol. 4 No. 7 – January 17, 1970  

Vol. 4 No. 8 – January 24, 1970  

Vol. 4 No. 14 – March 7, 1970 

Vol. 4 No. 17 – March 28, 1970 

Vol. 4 No. 21 – April 25, 1970 

Vol. 4 No. 22 – May 9, 1970 

Vol. 4 No 24 – May 19, 1970 

Vol. 4 No 25 & 26 – May 31, 1970

Vol. 4 No 29 – June 20, 1970

Vol. 4 No. 30 – June 27, 1970  

Vol. 4 No. 1 – July 4, 1970 (incorrect volume, should be Volume 5)  

Vol. 4 No. 3 – July 25, 1970

Vol. 5 No. 6 – August 8, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 7 – August 15 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 9 – August 21, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 11 – September 12, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 12 – September 19, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 15 – October 10, 1970

Vol. 5 No. 16 – October 17, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 18 – October 31, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 21 – November 21, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 22 – November 28, 1970

Vol. 5 No. 23 – December 5, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 24 – December 14, 1970

Vol. 5 No. 25 – Dec. 19, 1970

Vol. 5 No. 26 – December 26, 1970 

Vol. 5 No. 27 – January 2, 1971 

Vol. 4 No. 28 – January 9, 1971 – (incorrect volume number)

Vol. 4 No. 29 – January 18, 1971 

Vol. 5 No. 30 – January 23, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 1 – January 30, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 2 – February 6, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 3 – February 13, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 4 – February 20, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 5 – February 27, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 6 – March 6, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 8 – March 20, 1971 

Vol.. 6 No. 9 – March 27, 1971

Vol. 6 No. 10 – April 3, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 11 – April 10, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 12 – April 17, 1971

Vol. 6 No. 13 & 14 – May 1, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 15 – May 8, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 16 – May 15, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 17 – May 22, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 18 – May 29, 1971 

Vol. 6 No.19 – June 5, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 20 – June 12, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 21 – June 19, 1971

Vol. 6 No. 22 – June 26, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 24 – July 10, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 26 – July 24, 1971 

Vol. 6 No. 27 – August 2, 1971

Vol. 6 No. 28 – August 9, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 2 – September 4, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 3 – September 11, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 4 – September 18, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 5 – October 4, 1971

Vol. 7 No. 6 – October 9, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 8 – October 16, 1971

Vol. 7 No. 9 – October 23, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 12 – November 13, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 14 – November 29, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 16 – December 11, 1971 

Vol. 7 No. 17 – December 18, 1971

Vol. 7 No. 19 – January 1, 1972 

Vol. 7 No. 22 – January 22, 1972 

Vol. 7 No. 23 – January 29, 1972

Vol. 7 No. 24 – February 5, 1972 

Vol. 7 No. 28 – March 4, 1972 

Vol. 7 No. 29 – March 11, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 2 – April 1, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 5 – April 22, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 6 – April 29, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 7 – May 6, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 8 – May 13, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 11 – June 3, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 12 – June 10, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 15 – July 1, 1972

Vol. 8 No. 17 – July 15, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 22 – August 19, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 23 – August 23, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 24 – September 2, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 25 – September 9, 1972 

Vol. 8 No. 27 – September 23, 1972

Vol. 8 No. 29 – October 7, 1972

Vol. 9 No. 1 – October 21, 1972 

Vol. 9 No. 5 – November 16, 1972 

Vol. 9 No. 7 – November 30, 1972 

Vol. 9 No. 9 – December 16, 1972 

Vol. 9 No. 10 – December 23, 1972 

Vol. 9 No. 18 – February 17, 1973 

Vol. 9 No. 20 – March 3, 1973 

Vol. 9 No. 27 – April 21, 1973 

Vol. 9 No. 30 – May 12, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 1 – May 19, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 4 – June 9, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 5 – June 16, 1973

Vol. 10 No. 11 – July 28, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 13 – August 11, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 20 – September 29, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 24 – October 27, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 26 – November 10, 1973

Vol. 10 No. 27 – November 17, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 30 – December 8, 1973 

Vol. 10 No. 32 – December 22, 1973

Vol. 11 No. 16 – April 13, 1974 

Vol. 11 No. 25 – June 15, 1974 

Vol. 13 No. 15 – June 2, 1975 

Vol. 13 No. 19 – June 30, 1975

Vol. 16 No. 1 – November 13, 1976 

Charter Bulletin

Charter Bulletin was the newsletter of the Civil Rights Congress (1946-56), a nationwide organization that had 60 chapters and 10,000 members at its peak.

It took up the high profile racial justice cases of the Martinsville 7, Rosa Lee Ingram, the Trenton 6 and Willie McGee. It helped lead the fight for a federal anti-lynching law and a permanent Fair Employment Practices Commission.

It laid charges of genocide against black people in the United States at the United Nations.

The CRC defended the U.S. Communist Party and attacks on civil liberties. It was declared a subversive organization by the U.S. government in 1947 and many of its leaders were jailed during the Red Scare.

Vol. 2 No. 2 – Jan. 8, 1951

Committee Against Racism National Report

The Committee Against Racism (CAR) published their National Report beginning in December 1974 after the organization was formed in late 1973 out of the remnants of the Worker-Student Alliance of the Students for Democratic Society.

CAR had chapters across the country and attacked pseudo-scientific theories of black racial inferiority, organized and called for demonstrations against racism during the Boston busing crisis of 1975 and confronted the Ku Klux Klan and Nazi organizations.

The committee later changed its name to the International Committee against Racism (InCAR) and replaced its newsletter with a magazine called Arrow.

InCAR’s mission statement (reprinted on the inside front cover of every Arrow issue) said that it “recognizes the absolute necessity of unity of communists and non-communists in this struggle” against both societal and organized racism.

The Progressive Labor Party saw the organization as “a radical organization led by the Party which the Party builds in order to advance the struggle for communism.”

The group disbanded in 1996 as the Progressive Labor Party abandoned an attempt to gradually win activists to communism through INCAR and instead pursued recruiting them directly into the party.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – December 1973

Finally Got the News

Published by the national African Liberation Support Committee based in Washington, D.C. Similar to the local ALSC, this newsletter also reflects a turn toward the working class and Marxism-Leninism.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – October 1974

Vol. 1 No. 2 – December 1974

I Am We

The Committee for Justice for Huey P. Newton and the Black Panther Party based in Oakland, Ca. published a national newsletter, I Am We.

By this time, the Black Panther Party was pulling most of its remaining cadre in cities across the country to its base in Oakland, Ca.

Vol. 1 No. 3 – May/June 1975

Panther Trial News – What’s Really Happening at the Trial of Bobby and Ericka

The Panther Trial News was a periodic newsletter detailing events surrounding the trial of Black Panther chair Bobby Seale and New Haven Panther leader Ericka Huggins who were charged with kidnapping and murder of an alleged police informant.

The newsletter was published from October 1969 until May 1971 when the jury deadlocked 11 to 1 for Seale’s acquittal and 10 to 2 for Huggins’ acquittal. Prosecutors dropped the charges shortly afterward. Copies are from Spark files and the Roz Payne Sixties Archive.

No. 1 – June 29, 1970

No. 3 – July 19, 1970

No. 4 – July 27, 1970

Vol. 2 No. 1 – Oct. 25, 1970

The Patriot

The Patriot was the national newspaper of the Patriot Party, a white left-wing revolutionary organization aligned with the Black Panther Party, that was distributed in the greater Washington, D.C. area in 1970.

The Patriot Party was initially formed as the Young Patriots Organization in Chicago and later expanded nationwide as the Patriot Party. It was one of the component organizations of Black Panther Fred Hampton’s original Rainbow Coalition in Chicago.

They rejected white supremacy but wore a confederate flag patch on their shirts.

They organized in the Washington, D.C. area 1970-71 out of the Panther office on 18th Street NW and their Community Center on 17th Street NW focusing are far southeast Washington where working class whites still lived and the inner suburbs of Prince George’s County.

There were three issues of The Patriot. We currently have one. For a PDF of this 16-page tabloid, see:

Vol. 1 No. 1 – March 21, 1970 

Poll Tax Repealer

The Poll Tax Repealer was the national newsletter of the National Committee to Abolish the Poll Tax.

The national campaign against the poll tax began in the early 1940s and continued through the end of the decade. The campaign had some success at the local level as some states repealed their poll tax, including Georgia in 1945.

The civil rights movement wasn’t successful at ending the tax until the 24thAmendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified in 1964. Poll taxes in state elections were outlawed by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1966

Vol. 2 No. 2 – March 1943

Vol. 4 No. 1 – April 1945

Vol. 4 No. 3 – May 4, 1945

Vol. 4 No. 5 – June 1, 1945

Vol. 4 No. 6 – June 15, 1945

Vol. 4 No. 6 – First July issue, 1945

Vol. 4 No. 9 – Second August issue, 1945

Vol. 4 No. 11 – Second September issue, 1945

Vol. 4 No 12 – First October issue, 1945

Vol. 4 No 14 – First November Issue, 1945

Vol. 4 No. 15 – Second November issue, 1945

Vol. 4 No. 16 – December, 1945

Vol. 5 (No number) – August, 1946

Right On!

Right On! was initially published by the New York chapter of the Black Panther Party after a split within the Black Panther Party. Panther leader Huey Newton expelled Kathleen and Eldridge Cleaver, the entire International section, the entire New York branch, Geronimo Pratt and several others from the group in early 1971.

The first issue of Right On! provides what it says is a telephone transcript of a conversation between Newton and E. Cleaver after the split. While personalities played a role, the political differences (perhaps oversimplified) can be characterized as the Cleaver faction advocating armed struggle while the Newton faction wished to emphasize community service and electoral politics.

Kathleen Cleaver returned from exile to the U.S. to  create the Revolutionary People’s Communication Network that ultimately published Right On!, Babylon and Voice of the Lumpen. Right On! replaced Babylon as the chief newspaper of the Network in 1972. Cleaver saw her role as the above-ground support for the underground armed struggle against the United States.

Issues are from the Spark collection and the Wisconsin Historical Society

Vol. 1 No. 1 – April 3, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 2 – May 17, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 3 – August 3, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – September 1, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – September 15, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 6 – October 1, 1971 ca. 

Vol. 1 No. 7 – November 1, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 8 – November 16, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 9 – December 4, 1971 

Vol. 1 No. 11 – January 1, 1972  

Vol. 2 No. 1 – February 29, 1972 

Vol. 2 No. 3 – May 31, 1972 

Vol. 2 No. 6 – November 1972 

Vol. 2 No. 7 – January 15, 1973 

Vol. 2 No. 9 – May 1974 

SNCC Periodicals

SNCC published a number of periodicals that evolved over the years beginning with The Student Voice in 1960 later changing its name to The Voice. The SNCC Newsletter replaced The Voice in 1967. Internal Newsletters were also published.

~ The Student Voice

The Student Voice was published from 1960-65 changing its name to The Voice in 1965. It covers SNCC campaigns, local SNCC news and analysis of national and international events.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – June 1960 through Vol. 6 No 6 – December 1965 – (off-site at the CRMV website) – SNCC internal newsletters also available

~ SNCC News of the Field

News of the Field replaced the Voice in 1966 and acted as more of an internal newsletter reporting chapter news and campaigns

No. 3 – March 9, 1966 through No. 11 May 8, 1966 – (off-site at the CRMV website) – some issues missing

~ SNCC Newsletter

The successor publication to The Student Voice and The Voice began publishing in 1967 while Stokely Carmichael (later Kwame Ture) was chair of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and continued publishing under new chair H. Rap Brown (later Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin).

The July 1967 edition contains a controversial opinion piece on Palestine, published shortly after the Third Arab-Israeli War, which caused the organization to be labeled anti-Semitic.

SNCC released a more formal statement in response on August 15, 1967, entitled “The Middle-East Crisis.” It incorporates many of the points that were made in the June-July article, but within an added context that acknowledged the horrors of the Holocaust, the suppression of American Jewish voices that protested Zionism, and the critical support given to Zionism by the United States.

This incarnation of the SNCC newsletter published as a full-size newspaper:

Vol. 1 No. 4 – June 1967 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – September 1967 (missing pages 3, 4, 5, 6) 

Unity & Struggle

The national newspaper of the Congress of Afrikan People which had moved from a pan-Africanist perspective toward Marxism-Leninism. The group was led by the poet and black activist Imamu Amiri Baraka.

Vol. 5 No. 5 – May 1976

National GI & Veterans

GI Press Service

The GI Press Service acted as a national clearinghouse and news service for a number of alternative GI newspapers around the country from 1969-71. It was affiliated with the Student Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam.

The press service was originally based in Washington, D.C. but moved its operations to New York in June 1970. Thereafter it began to decrease in frequency and content.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – June 26, 1969  

Vol. 1 No. 2 – July 10, 1969  

Vol. 1 No. 3 – July 24, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – August 7, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – August 21, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 6 – September 4, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 7 – September 18, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 8 – October 2, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 9 – October 16, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 10 – October 30, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 11 – November 13, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 12 – November 27, 1969 

Vol. 1 No. 13 – December 11, 1969  

Vol. 1 No. 14 – December 25, 1969 

Vol. 2 No. 1 – January 21, 1969

Vol. 2 No. 2 – February 4, 1969 

Vol. 2 No. 3 – February 26, 1969 

Vol. 2 No. 4 – March 13, 1969 

Vol. 2 No. 5 – March 27, 1969 

Vol. 2 No. 6 – April 24, 1969 

Special Issue – May 8, 1970 ca.

Vol. 2 No. 7 – May 22, 1970 

Vol. 2 No. 8 – July 1, 1970  

Vol. 2 No. 9 – September 21, 1970 

Vol. 3 No. 1 – February 1, 1971  

Vol. 3 No. 2 – March 1971 

Vol. 3 No. 3 – April 1971  

Vol. 3 No. 4 – May 1971 

Vol. 3 No. 5 – June 1971 

Vol. 3 No. 6 – September 1971 

Vol. 3 No. 7 – October 1971 

Winter Soldier

Winter Soldier was the national publication of Vietnam Veterans Against the War (VVAW) from 1973-75. It was the successor publication to 1st Casualty (1971–1972).

VVAW started fairly small, but a number of high-profile actions caused many to flock to the organization and by 1973 had perhaps 20-30,000 members and added another 10-20,000 supporters when it opened its doors to non-veterans.  

Vol. 3 No. 2 through Vol. 4 No. 3 – April 1, 1973 through March 1, 1974 (off site at Independent Voices)

National Social and Economic Justice

The Welfare Fighter

The Welfare Fighter was the national newspaper of the National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) that was created in 1966  to fight for greater assistance and control over welfare regulations.

NWRO, which had four goals: adequate income, dignity, justice, and democratic participation, was active from 1966 to 1975.  At its height in 1969 it had a membership of as many as 25,000 people, with thousands more participating in NWRO protests. The majority of the members were African American women who often were on public assistance.

The organization popularized the slogan $5,500 or fight, later amending it to $6,500 or fight because of inflation. The slogan represented the demand for a guaranteed yearly national income.

The funding for the organization dried up in the early 1970s and in March 1975, the NWRO went bankrupt and the organization came to an end.

Vol. 2 No. 5 – February 1971 

National Student

Fight Back

Fight Back was the monthly publication of the Attica Brigade (later Revolutionary Student Brigade) and organization affiliated with the Revolutionary Union and later the Revolutionary Communist Party.

The Attica Brigade was based among college students and at its peak had dozens of chapters across the country. It was part of the New Communist Movement that arose in the early 1970s.

Vol. 1 No. 3 – Dec.-Jan. 1974

Vol. 1 No. 4 – Feb. 1974

Jailbreak

Jailbreak was a publication of the High School Youth Against War and Fascism from at least 1970-71 that sought to educate and involve high school students in the broader movement for social justice.

Youth Against War and Fascism (YAWF) traces its roots back to 1962 when it was formed by the Workers World Party—a split off from the Trotskyist Socialist Workers Party.

Jailbreak was a term used by both YAWF and the late phases of the Students for a Democratic Society in an appeal to high school students to break out of the “jail” of high school regimen and thought.

On a few occasions, including at Western High School in Washington, D.C., SDS attempted to enter the school and encourage a student jailbreak (walkout).

Vol. 2 No. 1 – February 1971 

SNCC Periodicals

SNCC published a number of periodicals that evolved over the years beginning with The Student Voice in 1960 later changing its name to The Voice. The SNCC Newsletter replaced The Voice in 1967. Internal Newsletters were also published.

~ The Student Voice

The Student Voice was published from 1960-65 changing its name to The Voice in 1965. It covers SNCC campaigns, local SNCC news and analysis of national and international events.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – June 1960 through Vol. 6 No 6 – December 1965 – (off-site at the CRMV website) – SNCC internal newsletters also available

~ SNCC News of the Field

News of the Field replaced the Voice in 1966 and acted as more of an internal newsletter reporting chapter news and campaigns

No. 3 – March 9, 1966 through No. 11 May 8, 1966 – (off-site at the CRMV website) – some issues missing

~ SNCC Newsletter

The successor publication to The Student Voice and The Voice began publishing in 1967 while Stokely Carmichael (later Kwame Ture) was chair of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) and continued publishing under new chair H. Rap Brown (later Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin).

The July 1967 edition contains a controversial opinion piece on Palestine, published shortly after the Third Arab-Israeli War, which caused the organization to be labeled anti-Semitic.

SNCC released a more formal statement in response on August 15, 1967, entitled “The Middle-East Crisis.” It incorporates many of the points that were made in the June-July article, but within an added context that acknowledged the horrors of the Holocaust, the suppression of American Jewish voices that protested Zionism, and the critical support given to Zionism by the United States.

This incarnation of the SNCC newsletter published as a full-size newspaper:

Vol. 1 No. 4 – June 1967 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – September 1967 (missing pages 3, 4, 5, 6) 

SDS Periodicals

Though its roots went back to the League for Industrial Democracy established in 1905, the Students for a Democratic Society was formally constituted in 1960.

It became the largest mass organization of the New Left from 1964-69. At its 9th convention in the summer of 1969, the organization split into three factions—the Progressive Labor dominated Worker-Student Alliance faction, Revolutionary Youth Movement I (the Weathermen) and Revolutionary Youth Movement II, which would itself split into competing Maoist factions.

At its peak, SDS had chapters at over 300 colleges, universities and high schools and had upwards of 100,000 members and supporters.

~ Bulletin

SDS Bulletin published from 1962-65 that was more of a traditional  8 ½ x 11 newsletter, but contained opinion pieces, news and acted as a forum for debate within the organization. Please contact us if you have issues missing from this collection.

No. 3 – January 1963

No. 4 – March 1963

Vol. 2 No. 1 – October 1963 – missing pages 9-10

Vol. 2 No. 2 – November 1, 1963 

Vol. 2 No. 3 – December, 1963

Vol. 2 No. 4 – January 1, 1964 

Vol. 2 No. 6 – March 1, 1964

Vol. 2 No. 7 – April 1, 1964

Vol. 2 No. 8 – May 1, 1964 

Vol. 2 No. 9 – June 1964 – missing pages 27-28

Vol. 2 No. 10 – July 1964

Vol. 3 No. 1 – September 1964

Vol. 3 No. 2 – October 1964

Vol. 3 No. 3 – November-December 1964

Vol. 3 No. 4 – January 1965

Vol. 3 No. 5 – February 1965

Vol. 3 No. 6 – March 1965

Vol. 3 No. 7 – May 1965

Vol. 3 (No number, Special Edition) – October 1965

Vol. 4 No. 1 – circa November 1965

Vol. 4 No. 2 – circa January 1966

~ New Left Notes

New Left Notes replaced the Bulletin in January 1966 and published until 1969. It was tabloid-sized and more free-form than the Bulletin, but served much of the same purpose containing opinion pieces, news and a forum for debate. We have all copies of New Left Notes, except possibly Vol. 4 No. 10 that we believe is a phantom issue and does not exist and that subsequent issues are simply mis-numbered.   These digital copies are drawn from our own hard copies and from The Independent Voices website, the SDS website and the Wisconsin Historical Society. 

Vol. 1 No. 1 – January 21, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 2 – January 28, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 3 – February 4, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 4 – February 11, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 5 – February 18, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 6 – February 25, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 7 – March 4, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 8 – March 11, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 9 – March 18, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 10 – March 25, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 11 – April 1, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 12 – April 8, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 13 – April 15, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 14 – April 22, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 15 – April 29, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 16 – May 6, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 17 – May 13, 1966

Vol. 1 No. 18 – May 20, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 19 – May 27, 1966  

Vol. 1 No. 20 – June 3, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 21 – June 10, 1966  

Vol. 1 No. 22 – June 17, 1966 – 

Vol. 1 No. 23 – June 24, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 24 – July 1, 1966

Vol. 1 No. 25 – July 8, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 26 & 27 – July 15 & 22, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 28 – July 29, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 29 – August 5, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 30 – August 12, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 31 – August 19, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 32 – August 24, 1966

Vol. 1 No. 33 – September 2, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 34 – September 9, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 35 – September 16, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 36 – September 23, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 37 – October 1, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 38 – October 7, 1966

Vol. 1 No. 39 – October 14, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 40, 41 – October 28, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 42 – November 4, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 42 – November 11, 1966 – mis-numbered

Vol. 1 No. 44 – November 18, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 45 – November 25, 1966 

Vol. 1 No 46 – December 2, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 47 – December 9, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 48 – December 16, 1966 

Vol. 1 No. 49 – December 23, 1966

Vol. 1 No 49 – December 30, 1966 (mis-numbered) 

Vol. 2 No. 1 – January 6, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 2 – January 13, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 3 – January 20, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 4 – January 27, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 5 – February 3, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 6 – February 13, 1967 

Vol. 2. No. 7 – February 20, 1967 

Vol. 2. No. 8 – February 27, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 9 – March 6, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 10 – March 13, 1967  

Vol. 2 No. 11 – March 20, 1967  

Vol. 2 No. 12 – March 27, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 13 – April 3, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 14 – April 13, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 15 – April 17, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 16 – April 24, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 17 – May 1, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 18 – May 8, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 19 – May 15, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 20 – May 22, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 21 – May 22, 1967 – (mis-dated) 

Vol. 2 No. 22 – June 5, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 23 – June 12, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 24 – June 29, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 25 – June 26, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 26 – July 10, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 27 – July 24, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 28 – August 7, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 29 – August 21, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 30 – September 4, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 31 – September 11, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 32 – September 18, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 33 – September 25, 1967  

Vol. 2 No. 34 – October 2, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 35 – October 9, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 36 – October 16, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 37 – October 23, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 38 – October 30, 1967

Vol. 2 No. 38 – November 6, 1967 – (mis-numbered) 

Vol. 2 No. 39 – November 13, 1967 – (mis-numbered)  

Vol. 2 No. 41 – November 27, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 42 – December 4, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 43 – December 4, 1967 – (mis-dated)

Vol. 2 No. 44 – December 18, 1967 

Vol. 2 No. 45 – December 25, 1967 

Vol. 3 No. 1 – January 8, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 2 – January 15, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 3 – January 22, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 4 – January 29, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 5 – February 5, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 6 – February 12, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 7 – February 19, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 7 – February 26, 1968 – (mis-numbered)  

Vol. 3 No. 8 – March 4, 1968 – (mis-numbered)  

Vol. 3 No. 10 – March 18, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 11 – March 25,  1968 

Vol. 3 No. 12 – April 8, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 13 – April 15, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 14 – April 22, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 15 – April 29, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 16 – May 6, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 17 – May 13, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 18 – May 20, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 19 – May 27, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 20 – June 10, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 21 – June 29, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 22 – July 8, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 23 – July 29, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 24 – August 5, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 25 – August 12, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 26 – August 19, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 27 – September 9, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 28 – September 16, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 29 – September 22, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 30 – September 30, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 31 – October. 7, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 32 – October 18, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 33 – October 25, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 34 – November 11, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 35 – November 19, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 36 – December 4, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 37 – December 11, 1968  

Vol. 3 No. 38 – December 18, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 39 – December 23, 1968 

Vol. 3 No. 40 – January 8, 1969 (mis-numbered volume and number)

Vol. 4 No. 2 – January 15, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 3 – January 22, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 4 – January 29, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 5 – February 5, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 5 – February 5, 1969 (mis-numbered and mis-dated) 

Vol. 4 No. 7 – February 21, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 8 – February 28, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 9 – March 8, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 10 – unavailable at this time – possibly a phantom issue that does not exist and subsequent issues are incorrectly numbered

Vol. 4 No. 11 – March 13, 1969

Vol. 4 No. 12 – March 20, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 13 – April 4, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 14 – April 10, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 15 – April 17, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 16 – April 24, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 17 – May 1,  1969 

Vol. 4 No. 18 – May 13, 1969

Vol. 4 No. 19 – May 20, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 20 – May 30, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 21 – June 6, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 22 – June 18, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 23 – June 25, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 24 – July 8, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 25. – July 24, 1969  

Vol. 4 No. 26 – August 1, 1969  

Vol. 4 No. 27 – August 8, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 28 – August 23, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 29 – August 29, 1969 

Vol. 4 No. 29 – August 29, 1969 (supplement)  

~ Fire

Fire replaced New Left Notes after the 1969 convention of the organization where it split into three factions—the Weathermen (later Weather Underground) that controlled the national office, the Progressive Labor Party dominated rival SDS headquartered in Boston and the Revolutionary Youth Movement II which in turn split into competing Maoist factions. Fire published three issues as an SDS publication before the group dropped the SDS name. We have all three issues

Vol. 1 No. 1 – November 7, 1969

Vol. 1 No. 2 – November 21,  1969  

Vol. 1 No. 3 – December 6, 1969 

Related to SDS Fire

1969 11 The Second Battle of Chicago 1969 

~ Radical America

Radical America began publication as an SDS-sponsored history journal in 1967 and outlived the organization, publishing until 1992. 

Vol. 1 No. 2 – September 1967 through Vol. 24 No. 4 – September 1990 – (off site at the Brown University Library) – some issues missing

~ Caw!

CAW! was a brief-lived SDS magazine that published four issues 1968-69 that contained poetry, songs, art and in-depth articles. We have all four issues.

Vol. 1 No. 1 – February 1968  

Vol. 1 No. 2 – May 1968 

Vol. 1 No. 3 – Fall 1968  

Special Cuba Supplement – Jan 1969

USNSA Periodicals

The United States National Student Association published a number of periodicals during its existence including USNSA News, USNSA Congress News and The American Student.

USNSA was an umbrella group for student governments in the U.S. established in the late 1940s that was revealed in 1967 to have been partially funded by the Central Intelligence Agency. Following this scandal, the group broke all ties by 1969 and became a leading voice in the student antiwar movement.

~ The American Student

The American Student was the magazine published by the United States National Student Association (USNSA) during the mid 1960s.

The issue that Spark holds provides an overview of the state of campus politics in late 1966.

It profiles campus organizations and activists such as Paul Booth and the Students for Democratic Society, the Young Americans for Freedom, The non-activist Association of Student Governments, the Southern Student Organizing Committee, a member of the Progressive Labor Party and the Vietnam War and the debate over it at the USNSA’s own annual congress.

It also contains a brief description of non-single issue campus activists groups including Campus Americans for Democratic Action, Intercollegiate Society of Individualists, May Second Movement, Student Peace Union, Students for Democratic Society, W. E. B. DuBois Clubs of America, Young Americans for Freedom, Young Democratic Clubs of America, Young Socialist Alliance and Youth Against War and Fascism.

The available issue:

No. 3 – Winter, 1966 

~ USNSA Congress News

The United States National Student Association held an annual congress and published a daily newsletter during the week-long event. The August 16, 1970 edition of its convention in Minneapolis, MN recounts the passage of a resolution that mandated the organization to organize civil disobedience against the Vietnam War beginning May 1, 1971–the Mayday protests in Washington, D.C. that resulted in over 12,000 arrests. The issue was first debated on August 13th and reported in the August 14th issue.

August 11, 1970

August 12, 1970 ca.

August 14, 1970

August 16, 1970

August 17, 1970

August 18, 1970

International Periodicals

The Irish People

The Irish People was a weekly newspaper which served as the “Voice of Irish Republicanism in America” from 1972-2004 and was published in New York.

Published by volunteers who supported an Irish Republican political analysis, the paper provided weekly reports and analysis of events in Ireland related to the struggle against British rule. It also served as a contemporary weekly record and organizer of Irish-American political activity in the United States.

Vol. 4 No. 19 – May 14, 1976 

Vol. 5 No. 36 – September 11, 1976 

South Vietnam in Struggle

The English-language version of the Central Organ of the South Vietnam National Liberation Front (NLF, often called Viet Cong)

Vol. 7 No. 219 – October 22, 1973

Vol. 7 No. 220 – October 29, 1973

United Irishman

The United Irishman was the publication of the Irish Republican Army until 1970 and for the “Official” Irish Republican Army (OIRA) thereafter until it was replaced with the Irish People and the Workers Weekly in 1980.

The “Official” IRA got its name after the “Provisional” Irish Republican Army (Provos) split from the OIRA after the August 1969 raids by the paramilitary Ulster Defense Force (a group of loyalists to the British Crown in Northern Ireland that carried out attacks on Catholics) that burned out several Catholic neighborhoods.

The IRA had for several years taken a Marxist position that the working class Protestants were not the enemy and refrained from engaging them in combat except in limited defensive situations.

Vol. 36 No. 4 – April 1977 

Vol. 36 No. 5 – May 1977 

Vol. 36 No. 7 – July 1977 

Vol. 36 No. 9 – September 1977

Vol. 36 No. 10 – October 1977 

Vol. 38 No. 1 – January 1978 

Unity

Unity is a weekly newspaper, slightly smaller than tabloid size, produced by the Belfast office of the Communist Party of Ireland(CPI).

Vol. 1 No. 15 – January 3, 1976

 

 

 

–return to documents–

%d bloggers like this: